Giant boob to make a statement on women feeding their children in public

Grey London & Mother London Killing it

Musings

Grey London has re-established itself as Valenstein & Fatts (the surnames of its two Jewish founders) as a call for diversity for the next 100 days.

It’s 1917. New York is booming. Two young Jewish entrepreneurs, Lawrence Valenstein and Arthur Fatt, set up a company. But anti-Semitism is rife. Their names could cost them business. So they call it Grey, after the color of the wallpaper.

Great idea ~ hopefully it will actually make an impact.

And recently Mother London also made a strong statement—about women feeding their children in public— by creating a giant inflatable boob and placing it atop a building.

London Agencies are killing it!

 

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art does change the world

New Ways of Seeing

Musings

I uncharacteristically decided to click on an ad—a Tiffany & Co. paid post on the New York Times website—because it mentioned Miranda July AND the Whitney Biennial. Color me impressed!

Miranda J dressed up as Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

Miranda July as Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Biennial

It’s a video series featuring artists included in past Whitney Biennials (Catherine Opie, Miranda J, Kehinde Wiley &more) and other art folk (Jerry Saltz, Tavi Gevinson). They talk about where art comes from, it’s meaning, systems of art making, the Biennial, the role of digital art, etc. So far only the first 3 videos seem to be available and I’m looking forward to watching the 2 others.

Tavi G and Douglas Coupland, his art deals with facial de-recognition software


The film series is inspired by John Berger’s Ways of Seeing, which was probably the most insightful book I read in college and has really stuck with me. I’ve just watched the 4-part BBC television series—it feels good to flex that Art History muscle a bit!

In the 44 years since the program aired, the discussion of what constitutes art has only become louder and more provocative. It’s a debate with many views.

According to the site, Tiffany’s founder, Charles Lewis Tiffany, served as an original trustee of the Metropolitan Museum and the company is still a patron of the arts and will be sponsoring the next 3 Biennials. I think these films are a pretty nice way to promote this partnership, though I found the actual micro site itself lacking and too scroll-y.

I must get to the Whitney and see the Biennial soon. I also would I’d like to see The Seasons in Quincy, a movie about Berger later in life. And a few weeks ago while walking passed Tiffany’s I told my sister that I had never been inside and she couldn’t believe it. So maybe now I’ll actually to go in (won’t be purchasing anything though)! Lots of activities to add to my to-do list…

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#Strengthie / ONE.org

Musings

strengthie-projectionI passed this projected psa on the Hudson Hotel on the way home. While it wasn’t immediately apparent what it was about, my interest was piqued. Turns out it’s a campaign by ONE.org to empower/support women and girls #Strengthie. It’s targeting those who will be voting at the UN tomorrow. They will be deciding outcomes that effect everyone in the poorest countries, but disproportionately woman usually get a raw deal—socially, legally economically….

Yesterday I was on a crowded train with my mom and we helped two UN delegates from Nepal. They had gotten very lost on their way to an event at a museum and the train was doing its confusing weekend nonsense. There had been so many other delegates trying to hail cabs, that they braved mass transit. They asked if my mom and I had ever been to their country and jokingly compared the NYC subway to Mount Everest. I wondered & worried about them all afternoon. I hoped they hadn’t completely missed their program and wished we could have talked to them more.

I have just started getting very reflective while writing this post. I realize it’s quite easy to be here in the US and say things should be better elsewhere. And there are so many problems in this country as well. I can sign an online petition from the comfort of my apartment and then what?… I definitely do not have the answer for that, not at all. So for now I will just say that I appreciated the design of the ONE.org website. The colors, iconography, and information layout/architecture are all good:

one-website{Bono has a good team!}

Woodstock Posters & ads

Musings

I visited the Museum at Bethel Woods Center for the Arts last week. They do good job of setting the scene of the 1960’s in general by illustrating the changes the nation was going through—both socially and politically. But I most enjoyed all the Woodstock memorabilia and the sections talking about the festival itself. I really appreciated that they had a lot of the printed ephemera on display.



woodstock-aquarian-expositionIt was interesting to see the various ways that the Aquarian Exposition was portrayed in the posters and ads. Just the fact that it had an art component, in addition to the music, was not really something I had been aware of. (Unfortunately, the photos I took aren’t great since they were through the glass exhibition cases, but you can get a sense of the designs…)

The first depiction is all Art Nouveau and highly decorative. Not a look I ever equated with Woodstock. It was created by David Edward Byrd and is based on  Jean Auguste Dominique Ingre’s La Source. The slightly sad story (and a clearer image) of how Bryd left for vacation and couldn’t be contacted to redo the piece can be found here.