Poster House @ Tekserve

Musings, thoughts on art

A museum dedicated to posters is opening in New York AND it’s going to be housed in the old Tekserve store—both these things makes me so happy! I find poster design somewhat daunting—it can be anything, I like more boundaries—so I’m always impressed when I come across great posters. In general, they remind me of being back at Pratt, where our professors would show us all these inspiring examples….

Okay so back to Poster House—I’m giddily checking out their website, super excited for a new design museum to be opening in NYC and thinking it’s so cool that they will be in an iconic location. The logo is designed by Paula Scher and then I read the letter from their president, Val Crosswhite, and it ends with her unknowing shout out to Mother:

…I walk past a barbershop in Port Authority that has a dozen posters in their window of different hair models. All have the strangely evocative words ‘Love, Mother’ in the corner, which I assume is the name of the company that produces them. The models are diverse in race, age, and hairstyle, but all of them are so vividly expressive, such clear characters as if ripped from the pages of an epic novel—so much of themselves is written on their faces. These posters have never induced me to get a haircut at this shop and they never will, but I look forward to seeing them every day. They make my day better.

I’m so excited! While I wait for their first pop up exhibition to open in September, I’ll be perusing the moving poster site for something a little similar and a little bit different.

Advertisements
art does change the world

New Ways of Seeing

Musings

I uncharacteristically decided to click on an ad—a Tiffany & Co. paid post on the New York Times website—because it mentioned Miranda July AND the Whitney Biennial. Color me impressed!

Miranda J dressed up as Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney

Miranda July as Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Biennial

It’s a video series featuring artists included in past Whitney Biennials (Catherine Opie, Miranda J, Kehinde Wiley &more) and other art folk (Jerry Saltz, Tavi Gevinson). They talk about where art comes from, it’s meaning, systems of art making, the Biennial, the role of digital art, etc. So far only the first 3 videos seem to be available and I’m looking forward to watching the 2 others.

Tavi G and Douglas Coupland, his art deals with facial de-recognition software


The film series is inspired by John Berger’s Ways of Seeing, which was probably the most insightful book I read in college and has really stuck with me. I’ve just watched the 4-part BBC television series—it feels good to flex that Art History muscle a bit!

In the 44 years since the program aired, the discussion of what constitutes art has only become louder and more provocative. It’s a debate with many views.

According to the site, Tiffany’s founder, Charles Lewis Tiffany, served as an original trustee of the Metropolitan Museum and the company is still a patron of the arts and will be sponsoring the next 3 Biennials. I think these films are a pretty nice way to promote this partnership, though I found the actual micro site itself lacking and too scroll-y.

I must get to the Whitney and see the Biennial soon. I also would I’d like to see The Seasons in Quincy, a movie about Berger later in life. And a few weeks ago while walking passed Tiffany’s I told my sister that I had never been inside and she couldn’t believe it. So maybe now I’ll actually to go in (won’t be purchasing anything though)! Lots of activities to add to my to-do list…

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

FAILE @ the Brooklyn Museum

Musings

FAILE-blacklight+neon

I admit that I don’t know a lot about the collective FAILE, but I can tell you that I had fun at the FAILE: Savage/Sacred Young Minds show at the Brooklyn Museum last week. There was an installation with walls collaged up with funky black-light posters, plus some neon signs and pinball machines to play!

There was also a more stately and sculptural installation. This piece is a temple paying tribute to the authenticity of youth. I particularly appreciated the tiled outside of it with this imperfectness.

FAILE-perfect-tile